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BSY news

Whether you are currently studying one of our courses or thinking of doing so, we hope the following feedback and information gives you inspiration when deciding on your future study plans.
You can read the latest comments on this page. Alternatively, if you would like to read information on specific topics, please click on the course categories below.

Latest articles


‘There has never been a better opportunity to improve our skills’

Annie Manning, MASC (CBT)/NLP life coach and author

All at BSY would like to send huge congratulations to Annie Manning, MASC (CBT)/NLP life coach and author, on completion of her Dementia Care course.

Like so many of us, Annie found her life and work affected by the COVID-19 pandemic – leaving her suddenly unable to work with her wonderful dementia clients.

Annie has studied courses with BSY over a number of years. Having recently enrolled onto the NCFE CACHE Level 2 and 3 Principles of Dementia Care courses, Annie decided to focus the time in which she would usually be helping clients on her studies instead.

Annie said: “In these unprecedented times there has never been a better opportunity to improve our skills and focus on our continual professional development.

“Speaking as a life coach and counsellor, having a structure to our day is vital and if we can enhance our skills for future use it makes perfect sense to do so.

“I have personally seen this enforced stay at home policy as a blessing and I know my clients will benefit from my dedication to my studies.”

As lockdown restrictions start to lift, Annie, who lives in St Albans, has already been able to put her new skills and knowledge into practice.

She explained: “I happily returned to some dementia client work having chosen one couple as my bubble and during discussions with the wife (carer) I can honestly say I was already able to call upon some of the focused learning and learning outcomes from this course.

“I would have no hesitation in recommending this course to others.”

In praising BSY’s staff and her personal tutor, Julia, Annie added: “Well done to the team going the extra mile with students to ensure we are supported during lockdown. Great service as I have enjoyed and come to expect over the past years.”

We are delighted to continue to support students like Annie in achieving their goals.

Categories: BSY, Health and Social Care


Avoid stress related illness this winter

Winter is a time that we all associated with colds and flu; and sometimes it is difficult to stay healthy during the winter months. Stress pays a major part in how resistant and susceptible we are to picking up infections and ailments so tackling stress before the cold and flu ‘season’ is upon us will help avoid days off work and lost time feeling unwell.

Winter is a time that we all associated with colds and flu; and sometimes it is difficult to stay healthy during the winter months. Stress pays a major part in how resistant and susceptible we are to picking up infections and ailments so tackling stress before the cold and flu ‘season’ is upon us will help avoid days off work and lost time feeling unwell.

Effective stress management techniques form part of many therapeutic programmes and they include reducing the stress hormone cortisol and so increase the efficiency of our immune systems; making healthy lifestyle choices which is difficult during dark winter months, so getting enough sleep, eating healthily and most importantly getting fresh air and exercise. Avoiding stressful situations will help and also practising stress management techniques such as physical activities, relaxation and meditation, and interacting with other people.

Stress continues to be a significant problem and according to research in the UK, work related stress is responsible for major loss of productivity because of lost days sickness or absence. So if you want to stay healthy, boost your immune system, and maintain good levels of wellbeing during the winter then reduce stress levels and make sure that you maintain a healthy lifestyle.

Categories: Counselling & Stress Management, Health and Social Care


Stand up!

The media has been reporting that we should all stand up more, so this means standing to work rather than sitting; walking or pacing when using the telephone, and generally being upright for a lot more of the day that we are perhaps used to. So what’s behind this suggestion? There has been a flurry of recent research into this and the findings suggest that being upright and slowly mobilising whist carrying out everyday tasks can lower the risk of developing Type 2 diabetes and also reduce obesity levels because low intensity exercise (which standing and pacing are) modify energy expenditure quite a lot. A study in 2007 by Levine and Miller outlined this process and from their research a ‘walk and stand desk’ was created.

The media has been reporting that we should all stand up more, so this means standing to work rather than sitting; walking or pacing when using the telephone, and generally being upright for a lot more of the day that we are perhaps used to. So what’s behind this suggestion? There has been a flurry of recent research into this and the findings suggest that being upright and slowly mobilising whist carrying out everyday tasks can lower the risk of developing Type 2 diabetes and also reduce obesity levels because low intensity exercise (which standing and pacing are) modify energy expenditure quite a lot. A study in 2007 by Levine and Miller outlined this process and from their research a ‘walk and stand desk’ was created.

This new regime is not just for office workers though; it has been taken up by those involved in childhood obesity research, diabetes research and also stress management research because it has been found that standing up more in all daily activities can yield significant benefits for our health. Therefore reading the paper, eating breakfast, speaking to clients on the telephone, can all (it is suggested) be easily done whilst standing. Research suggests that more standing and less sitting promotes an optimum metabolic level whilst the converse has a negative effect on cholesterol levels and fat metabolism. Standing up for three hours a day can use up an extra 750 calories which is a significant amount of energy. The benefits of this rather non- physical form of exercise should not be underestimated as it has other positive effects too, for example it improves balance and posture!

Schools in the UK are using this idea to try and tackle high levels of obesity in school age children. According to the Mail Online (2014), one school involved in a recent research study have been given adjustable desks which allow them to stand and do their schoolwork so that they are not sitting all the time they are in class. The research is based on the statistics that children living in developed countries spend 65% of their waking hours sitting down and these types of sedentary habits generally continue into adulthood; so the intention is to instil a healthier approach to low intensity exercise.

References

Clark, Laura, (2014) www.dailymail.co.uk

Levine JA, and Miller J. (2007) The energy expenditure of using a “walk-and-work” desk for office-workers with obesity. British Journal of Sports Medicine.

Categories: Health and Social Care, Sports & Fitness